What if I Fail to Register as a Sex Offender in South Carolina?

The South Carolina Sex Offender Registry was created so that the general public could have access to available information about sex offenders living in their area. For this reason, it has become mandatory for a convicted sex offender to notify the sheriff of the county in which they reside of their status as a sexual offender—which must be done upon their release from the Department of Corrections or as soon as they have been placed on probation for a sex crime. According to South Carolina Code §23-3-430 (C), anyone who has committing one or more of the following offenses could be subjected to mandatory registration:

  • Criminal sexual misconduct
  • Promoting a sexual performance by a child
  • Committing a lewd act upon a child under 16
  • Peeping, voyeurism or aggravated voyeurism
  • Kidnapping a child under the age of 18
  • Sexual battery of a spouse
  • Sexual intercourse with a patient

Once an individual has been convicted of any of the aforementioned crimes, they would be required to register twice a year for the rest of their life—in addition to notifying the sheriff every time they change their address. So what happens when a convicted sex offender fails to comply with the requirements of registration? Well, South Carolina Code §23-3-470 explains that failing to register is a crime that is punishable by up to one year in jail and a $1,000 fine. If the offender violates this law a second or subsequent time, they would be subject to much stiffer penalties. For this reason, it is imperative that you enlist the help of a Lexington criminal attorney from the Law Office of James R. Snell, Jr., LLC if you have been accused of violating this law. Call today at (888) 301-6004 for a free initial consultation.

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